Doner, taxi dash and download

Inebriated emailing is the new drunk dialing according to O2’s ‘Pulse’ monitor released today. New advanced smartphones are changing the way we use our mobiles after the pub. Where we once called ex partners or texted mates, we’re now emailing, downloading and changing our Facebook status.

O2’s ‘Pulse’ monitor reveals a surge in the use of mobile internet services between 10 and 11 at night ‘ just as the pubs are chucking out. O2 now sees more customer use of its mobile data network between 9pm and midnight than at any other point during an average day.

Email is the most used service at this time with almost half (42%) of customers using their phones to send late night emails at least once a week. A third visit social networking sites like Facebook to change their status or check out what their friends are doing. One in five people are downloading music at this time.

Top five used mobile internet services

Email (42%)

News headlines (35%)

Social Networking sites (33%)

Weather (30%)

Search (27%)

Men are driving this trend, accessing the internet on their phones nearly twice as often as women over a three month period (56 times on average, compared to 34 times on average).

People are also increasingly capturing their nightly exploits and sharing them using MMS according to O2. A third of all MMS messages on an average day are sent between 10pm and 5am.

Antony Douglas, Head of Content for O2 said: ‘The O2 Pulse research confirms that one of the first things people do on their way home from a night out is surf the web from their mobile. With applications and the internet now so easily available, customers are hungry to chat, gossip, play and Facebook the small hours away on their phones, which might lead to a few embarrassed red faces in the morning ‘ and not just from over-dosing on chilli sauce.’

O2 Pulse monitor is launched today and is a quarterly look at trends in mobile data usage, which will aim to give a snapshot of how O2 customers and wider consumers are accessing services on their phones.